Tag: research

A&SM#4 Full Programme

We are very pleased to confirm the full programme (see below) for the fourth Affect and Social Media one day conference at UEL’s USS building in Stratford, east London on Nov 7th.

The 2018 event marks the publication of the first Affect and Social Media book (Rowman & Littlefield International).

Together with 7 panels, featuring cutting edge international research and curated sensorium performances, there is a special keynote by Patricia Ticineto Clough followed by a keynote panel and audience Q&A.

The event will culminate with the A&SM book launch, live music from The Indelicates and refreshments.

A&SM#4 is free, but advance online registration is essential to gain access to UEL’s USS campus building.

To register and see more information on the conference visit: https://viralcontagion.blog/affect-social-media4/

Affect and Social Media#4 Programme

University Square Stratford, east London, UK, 7th Nov 2018, 10am-10pm

Download PDF Version

Time. Location

All Rooms TBC

Actual Occasion
10.00-11.10am Entrance to the University Stratford Square Campus Building Registration

Please note that before entering the campus all attendees must register online: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/affect-social-media4-notifications-from-the-technological-nonconscious-tickets-46972453874

11.15-11.45

Room USG.17 Main Lecture Theatre

Welcome to A&SM#4 by Tony D Sampson

plus Sensorium One

Break 15mins  
12-1pm

Parallel Sessions A

Choice of three panels

Panel 1: USG.17

Panel 2: USG19 or US2.30

Panel 3: USG20 or US2.31

Panel 1 Chaired by Greg Seigworth

 

Lisa Blackman (Goldsmiths, UK) Haunted Data

 

Camilla Møhring Reestorff (Aarhus University, Denmark) Affective Governmentalization: Backlashes again the #Metoo-movement in Denmark

 

Heather Radwan Jaber (University of Pennsylvania, USA) Sexual harassment and social media in Egypt: Reorienting the resonance machine

Panel 2 Chaired by Darren Ellis

 

Vered Elishar-Malka & Yaron Ariel (Yezreel Valley College, Israel) Social media, Legacy media, and the public, in the Trump(ing) era

 

Suzanne van Geuns (University of Toronto, Canada) Rational Virtuosity and Religious Promise: Aspiring toward Jordan Peterson in Reddit Debates

 

Fadi Safieddine, (Queen Mary University, UK)

Factors contributing to the continuing failure in combating the spread of fake news on Social Media

Panel 3 Chaired by Ian Tucker

 

Maximilian Stobbe, (Freie Universität, Berlin, Germany) My Reaction Can Be Summed up by the Guy at 2:23!” – YouTube Reaction Videos as Affective Practices

 

Orsolya Bajusz (Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary) The affective dynamics of online shaming and liberal moral outrage

 

Fulla Abdul-Jabbar (School of the Art Institute of Chicago, USA) Why did you cry when you read that poem

Break 5mins Find next panel
Parallel Session B

1.05-2.05pm

Choice of two panels

Panel 4 in USG. 19/20 or USG. 19

Panel 5 in USG.20 or US2.31

 

Panel 4 Chaired by Darren Ellis

 

Angie Voela (University of East London, UK) Fragile masculinities and contemporary psycho-power: The Case of InCel

 

Ali Lara (University of East London, UK) Affective Modulation in Positive Psychology’s Regime of Happiness

 

Trenton Lee (University of Westminster, UK) Feeling the Burn: Effect of Digital Capitalism on the Mental Health of Creators

 

Panel 5 Chaired by Stephen Maddison

 

Sarah Cefai (London College of Communication, UK) Stupid in the Moment: Excavating the Patriarchal Nonconscious of Humiliation

 

Christina Riley (George Mason University, Virginia), The Affective Flux of Feminist Digital Collectives or What Happened to the Women’s March of 2017

 

Annelot Prins (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany) How Much Do You Want To Meet Taylor Swift? The Cruel Optimism of Online
Fan Labour

 

 

 

2.05-3.05pm

In USG.19/20 and/or the Foyer

The Sensorium 2

The Actual Occasion – a silent disco with Mikey B Georgeson 

 

Parallel Session C

3.05-4.05pm

Choice of two panels

Panel 6 in USG. 19/20 or USG. 19

Panel 7 in USG.20 or US2.31

 

Panel 6 Chaired by Ali Lara

 

Antonia Hernández (Concordia University, Canada) The Simple, the Compound, and the Spurious: Assemblages of Bots and Humans on a Sexcam Platform

 

Elena Pilipets (Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt, Austria) Sleeping with Netflix: The (Dis)Connected Body of Serial Binge Viewer

 

Andreas Schellewald (University of Edinburgh, UK) Going down the algorithmic rabbit hole: approaching affective engagement in montage videos on social media platforms

 

Panel 7 Chaired by Stephen Maddison

 

Vered Elishar-Malka, Dana Weimann-Saks & Yaron Ariel (Yezreel Valley College, Israel) The Secret Online World of Women: Intimacy and Exposure among Women’s Closed Facebook Groups

 

Josie Barnard (Middlesex University, UK) The Multimodal Writer

 

 

4.05-4.15pm 10min break
Session D

4.15-6.45.pm in Main Lecture Theatre USG.17

Keynote Session

Patricia Ticineto Clough: The User Unconscious: Embodiment and Thought

Audience Q&A

Keynote Panel

Opening response by Gregory J. Seigworth (Millersville)

Keynote Panel

Jessica Ringrose (UCL), Amit Rai (Queen Mary), Rebecca Coleman (Goldsmiths), Darren Ellis and Ian Tucker (East London)

Audience Q&A with panel

Session D chaired by Tony D Sampson

 7-10pm

USG.19/20 and USS Foyer

Affect and Social Media book launch & Sensorium Performance 3 including

Live performance by The Indelicates

 

 

 

 

Are We All Addicts Now? Digital Dependence – book out now!

I have a chapter in this book (co-edited by Vanessa Bartlett & Henrietta Bowden-Jones) called ‘Tap My Head and Mike My Brain’: Neuromarketing and Digital Addiction – a nod (endnote) goes to Jussi Parikka’s Pynchon reference in his review of The Assemblage Brain.

I’m also taking part in the Are We All Addicts Now? symposium at Central St Martins (University of the Arts London) in collaboration with London Laser. The date for this event is yet to be fully confirmed, but likely to be at 6.30pm on Tuesday 7 November.

The book is published by Liverpool University Press: https://liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/products/100809

It’s part of an amazing looking exhibit at Furtherfield Gallery in London between 16 September – 12 November 2017: http://furtherfield.org/programmes/exhibition/are-we-all-addicts-now

Here’s the blurb

Are We All Addicts Now? Digital Dependence is an artist-led enquiry by Katriona Beales into digital hyper-connectivity and the normalization of addictive behaviours through our everyday interactions with digital devices. While internet addiction is not yet considered an official psychiatric disorder, it is gaining increased recognition as a behavioral phenomenon in both scientific study and the popular press. This project is the first interdisciplinary exploration of this burgeoning diagnostic territory. The book combines visual and textual research, including artistic works from Katriona Beales and Fiona MacDonald : Feral Practice, alongside essays from contributors in the fields of anthropology, digital culture, psychology and philosophy. Informed by the latest scientific research, the book acknowledges the increasing difficulty many people experience in controlling their online habits. At the same time, it also thinks beyond the biological model of internet addiction toward the social and political dimensions that shape everyday online activities and habit-forming behaviour. This book is co-edited by curator Vanessa Bartlett and medical doctor and neuroscience researcher Henrietta Bowden-Jones. It is published to coincide with a major exhibition of new artwork by Katriona Beales at Furtherfield, London.

The below text is taken from Vanessa Bartlett’s blog.

Are We All Addicts Now? Digital Dependence… new book goes to press

For the past two years I have been working in collaboration with artist Katriona Beales on her Welcome Trust funded project Are We All Addicts Now? The project developed off the back of her 2015 work White Matter, which I commissioned as part of my Group Therapy exhibition with FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology). The project will culminate in a major exhibition of new artwork by Katriona at Furtherfield, London this September.

Are We All Addicts Now?  is an artist-led enquiry into digital hyper-connectivity and the normalization of addictive behaviours through our everyday interactions with digital devices. While internet addiction is not yet considered an official psychiatric disorder, it is gaining increased recognition as a behavioral phenomenon in both scientific study and the press.

I have edited the Are We All Addicts Now? book in collaboration with medical doctor and neuroscience researcher Henrietta Bowden-Jones. It combines visual and textual research, including artistic works from Katriona, alongside essays from contributors in the fields of anthropology, digital culture, psychology and philosophy. Informed by the latest scientific research, the book acknowledges the increasing difficulty many people experience in controlling their online habits. At the same time, it also thinks beyond the biological model of internet addiction toward the social and political dimensions that shape everyday online activities and habit-forming behaviour. This book is the first interdisciplinary exploration of this burgeoning diagnostic territory.

The book also features some amazing visuals by designer Stëfan Schäfer (see featured image).

List of contributors:

Katriona Beales
Ruth Catlow
Mark D. Griffiths with Daria J. Kuss & Halley M. Pontes
Fiona MacDonald : Feral Practice
Gerald Moore
Emily Rosamond
Tony Sampson
Theodora Sutton

It’s due to be published on 15 September and is available from the Liverpool University Press website

Open Access: HEFCE, REF2020 and the Threat to Academic Freedom

Most academics would perhaps support an open access policy to their research, but it would appear that the current direction of government policy, albeit pointing toward freedom of access, is entering the all too often grey area of what it means to be open.

An article posted on the Disorder of Things blog and mailed out via the CAMPAIGNFORTHEPUBLICUNIVERSITY@JISCMAIL.AC.UK makes very interesting reading.

For those familiar with evil media stratagems, the so-called “gold” route is, it would seem, exemplary grey media.

Here’s a summary

  • The Government is pushing academic publishing to a ‘pay-to-say’ model in order to achieve open access to publicly funded research
  • This ‘gold’ route to open access, which levies Article Processing Charges, (as proposed in the Finch Report and taken up by RCUK and HEFCE) poses a major problem for academics in the UK:
    • It threatens academic freedom through pressures on institutions to distribute scarce APC resources and to judge work by standards other than peer review
    • It threatens research funding by diverting existing funds into paying for publications (and private journal profits) rather than into research
    • It increases academic inequality both across and within institutions, by linking prestige in research and publishing to the capacity to pay APCs, rather than to academic qualities
    • It threatens academic control of research outputs by allowing for commercial uses without author consent
  • In response, academics should:
    • Practice and lobby for ‘green’ open access of all post-peer reviewed work within journals and institutions
    • Lobby against proposed restrictions on REF2020 and against compliance pressure for ‘gold’ open access
    • Demand clear policies from Universities around open access funds
    • Ensure institutional resources are not unnecessarily spent on APCs
    • Protect the integrity of scholarly journals by rejecting the pressure for ‘pay-to-say’ publishing

    There’s a pdf version of the full piece here Open Access: HEFCE, REF2020 and the Threat to Academic Freedom