Tag: Affect and social media

Call for Papers for A&SM#4: Notifications from the Technological Nonconscious

Affect & Social Media#4: Notifications from the Technological Nonconscious

Conference date: Wednesday, November 7th 2018

Venue: University Square Stratford Building, East London, UK

Keynote: Patricia Ticineto Clough

Keynote Panel (tbc)

Conference Information Page: https://viralcontagion.wordpress.com/affect-social-media4/

Francesco-Tacchini

To mark the publication of the first Affect and Social Media book (Rowman and Littlefield, July 2018) we are very pleased to announce a cfp for a special A&SM#4 one day (free registration) conference.

We welcome 250 word abstracts for 15min presentations from scholars working across disciplinary borders, theories, concepts and methodologies (arts & humanities, social sciences, psychology, computer and data science etc.).

We especially welcome contributions from postgraduate students and early career researchers.

Abstracts should ideally respond creatively (and flexibly) to one of the six conference themes set out below.

Deadline for submission of abstracts: Sept 15th 2018.

Send a 250 word abstract as an email (no attachments) including full name, affiliation and email contact address to t.d.sampson@uel.ac.uk

Accepted abstracts will help to frame a series of subsequent discussion points/questions that will be addressed by our keynote panel (to be announced shortly).

Conference Themes

  1. Unthinking

The exponential rise of social media in the early twenty first century has drawn much critical attention in the humanities to a seemingly paradoxical human-computer relation. On one hand, human thought is both contemporaneous with, and frequently outperformed by, the uber-cognitions of corporate computational media technology. There is, indeed, much concern expressed about the possible absence of human consciousness from the computational world it created (Hayles, 2017; Hansen, 2015). On the other hand though, it would seem that the thoughts, feelings, behaviours and experiences of social media users, far from disappearing, are, often by design, captured and nudged from here to there by an expanding yet mostly imperceptible technological nonconscious (Clough, 2000, Thrift, 2007, Grusin, 2010). What, if anything, is disappearing in the human-computer relation?

  1. Addicting    

Computational media can no longer simply be defined through the operations of narrowly defined cognitive machines implicated in clandestine data harvesting and the manipulation of individual users through e.g. psychographic profiling. Social media is a “social” machine of capture that works on relations and shared felt experiences (Sampson, Maddison and Ellis, 2018), triggering habitual tendencies (Chun, 2016) that seem to produce mass media addictions (Bartlett and Bowden-Jones, 2017). As a major component part of the propagation of the technological nonconscious, social media is less defined today by the familiar ease of connection discourses of Web 2.0 than it is by the difficulty of disconnection (Karppi, 2018). Like other media of addiction (drugs, gambling, sex), social media hooks users in the event of the habit refrain, triggering subsequent emotional anxieties and contagions. Is social media addiction a problem of personal compulsion or collective masochism?

  1. Feeling 

Computational social media is a feeling machine. It feels, or prehends, the event (Ellis, 2018). But this does not mean that it has feelings, in the sense in which humans feel. There are limitations imposed on the potential of affective computing to actually feel (Shaviro, 2015). Social media is constrained to the mere reading of sentiment data, and like an actor, it can feign expressions of human emotion, but cannot feel them. However, the operational level of computational media can learn, algorithmically, from emotional experiences. It can pass on, or transmit, feelings. It can plant a behavioural hook in the user experience. Social media has an affective tone or atmosphere through which the human-computer relation strives. Feeling the event is a different matter.

  1. Sleeping

Always on social media never sleeps! “Prolonged awakening, work without the limit of time, excessive light, surplus information… links… attentional capture is the new Atopia” (Neyrat, 2017). But the users of social media are often positioned as vulnerable, sleepwalking user-subjects: the user unconscious (Clough, 2018), the network somnambulist (Sampson, 2012, 2016). Like Crary’s (1999) earlier rendition of attentive analogue media subjects, the users of social media are simultaneously attentive and inattentive, and attracted and distracted by the fascinations of notifications, posts, tweets, likes, shares… This technological nonconscious, or Unthought (Hayles, 2017) human-computer relation is not unconscious, as conventionally understood.

  1. Dreaming

In The User Unconscious: On Affect. Media, and Measure (2018), Patricia Ticineto Clough argues that computational media networks have fundamentally affected what it means to be human. “We are both human and other-than-human.” This luminous text explains what it means to live, think, and dream from this “other-than-human perspective.” Here Clough moves to answer questions concerning the extent to which human lives are now animated in the multiple layers of these vast computational networks and how these layers radically transform our sense of self, subjectivity, sociality, and unconscious processes. How can we probe what it means to live, think, and dream through this newly animated technological nonconscious?

  1. Trumping

Who is to blame for Trump? Trump on Twitter may seem like the unpredictable personal opinions of a racist, sexist, xenophobe that infects a population, but the technological nonconscious, or thing-self of the user unconscious, as Clough points out, “transgress[es] the separation of the personal and the networked.” It is the “affective tone” of social media itself that made Trump possible! Social media has given expressive support to a kind of microfascist populism or “population racism” that is currently spreading everywhere. What will it take to out trump the collective impulse that is Trump?

Top illustration by Francesco Tacchini, 2015

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Affect and Social Media out July 2018

In production now with Rowman & Littlefield

Affect and Social Media

Cover

Emotion, Mediation, Anxiety and Contagion

Edited by Tony D Sampson; Stephen Maddison and Darren Ellis

Affect and Social Media is an edited collection of twenty bite sized articles by leading scholars from across disciplinary boundaries. It is comprised of four distinct but related sections which are interspersed with artistic illustrations, depicting the affectivities that flow through social media. The term ‘affect’ denotes a rather slippery concept that is not as easily caught as for example ‘emotion’ or ‘feeling’. Quite often it denotes a more than or an excess to that which is felt in the human body or indexed through cultural grids of meaning. It can exist in ways which defy expectations, conventions, and representations. It is often understood as that which is vital to the emergence of the new and hence socio-cultural revolution. As life shifts ever more on-line, we find ourselves caught up in the affective flows of computer mediated practices into an ever expanding and indeterminate horizon. This compilation of articles that were initially presented at an international conference in East London, were selected on the basis of their ability to depict and conceptualise these radical movements of sociality.

 

Contents

Foreword by Gregory Seigworth

Introduction: On Affect and Social Media by Tony D. Sampson, Darren Ellis and Stephen Maddison

Part One: Digital Emotion

Introduction by Helen Powell

Chapter One: Social media, emoticons and process by Darren Ellis

Chapter Two: Anticipating affect: trigger warnings in a mental health social media site by Lewis Goodings

Chapter Three: Digitally mediated emotion: Simondon, affectivity and individuation by Ian Tucker

Chapter Four: Visceral data by Luke Stark

Chapter Five: Psychophysiological measures associated with affective states while using social media by Maurizio Mauri

Part Two: Mediated Connectivities, Immediacies & Intensities

Introduction by Jussi Parikka

Chapter Six: Social media and the materialisation of the affective present by Rebecca Coleman

Chapter Seven: The education of feeling: Wearable technology & triggering pedagogies by Alyssa D. Niccolini

Chapter Eight: Mediated affect & feminist solidarity: Teens’ using Twitter to challenge ‘rape culture’ in and around school by Jessica Ringrose and Kaitlynn Mendes

Part Three: Insecurity and Anxiety

Introduction by Darren Ellis and Stephen Maddison

Chapter Nine: Wupocalypse Now: Supertrolls and other risk Anxieties in social media interactions by Greg Singh

Chapter Ten: Becoming user in popular culture by Zara Dinnen

Chapter Eleven: #YouTuberanxiety: Affect and anxiety performance in UK beauty vlogging by Sophie Bishop

Chapter Twelve: Chemsex: anatomy of a sex panic by Jamie Hakim

Chapter Thirteen: Designing life? Affect and gay porn by Stephen Maddison

Chapter Four: Contagion: Image, Work, Politics and Control

Introduction by Tony D Sampson

Chapter Fourteen: The mask of Ebola: Fear, contagion, and immunity by Yiğit Soncul

Chapter Fifteen: The newsroom is no longer a safe zone: Assessing the affective impact of graphic user-generated images on journalists working with social media by Stephen Jukes

Chapter Sixteen: Emotions, social media communication and TV debates by Morgane Kimmich

Chapter Seventeen: The Failed Utopias of Walden and Walden Two by Robert Wright

Acknowledgements

Index

978-1-78660-438-5 • Hardback • July 2018 • $105.00 • (£70.00)
978-1-78660-439-2 • Paperback • July 2018 • $34.95 • (£23.95)
978-1-78660-440-8 • eBook • July 2018 • $32.95 • (£22.95) (coming soon)

https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781786604385/Affect-and-Social-Media-Emotion-Mediation-Anxiety-and-Contagion#

UEL news report on A&SM3

Leading academics examine social and digital media through the lens of felt experience

Affect-HighRes (82)

The emotional experience of bidding on eBay, the affective impact of Brexit on journalists and Donald Trump’s tweets were just a few of the topics explored when nearly two dozen leading thinkers from across the UK and Europe converged on the University of East London (UEL) for the third annual Affect and Social Media conference.

This year’s event focused on social and digital media through the lens of felt experiences, emotional engagements and affective entanglements. Speakers offered perspectives from a range of disciplinary approaches, including psychology, media and communications, education, politics, cultural studies, journalism and social sciences.

UEL’s Dr Tony Sampson, conference organiser, said, “Interest in emotions, feelings and affective experiences with social media has grown considerably since we started the Affect and Social Media conferences in 2015.

“Recently, we’ve had to contend with a deluge of posts about Brexit, Trump, post-truth and fake news, and some of our speakers talked about experiences linked to these political events.”

The conference’s keynote speakers were Professor Jessica Ringrose, of University College London, and Professor Emma Renold, of Cardiff University. Their talks examined feminist and pedagogical understandings of affectivity and power on social media.

The conference concluded with the Sensorium Art Show – an exhibition curated by UEL artists Dean Todd and Mikey Georgeson which responded creatively to the conference themes of experience, engagement and entanglement.

Organisers are currently editing a book based on the first two Affect and Social Media conferences, and discussing the possibility of creating a journal using material from the 2017 conference.  Plans are also in the works for UEL to host a conference in 2018.

13 June 2017 – Orginal: https://www.uel.ac.uk/news/2017/06/uel-hosts-third-affect-and-social-media-conference

Registration for Affect and Social Media 3.0 – deadline extended due to 404 error

Colleagues,

Apologies to anyone encountering a 404 error on the registration link for Affect and Social Media 3.0 in the last 24hours. This has now been fixed.

Please note, as a result we have extended registration to 20th May.

Join us on Thurs May 25th for a stimulating international and interdisciplinary programme of speakers, the sensorium art show plus drinks and nibbles.

Keynotes are Jessica Ringrose (UCL) and Emma Renold (Cardiff).

Full programme

https://viralcontagion.wordpress.com/2017/05/05/affect-and-social-media-3-0-final-programme-and-registration-deadline/

Direct link to registration

http://estore.uel.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/schools/arts-and-digital-industries-adi/affect-social-media3

External Students £3

Working £5

Free for UEL staff and students (must register).

Best wishes,

Tony

Affect and Social Media 3.0: Final Programme and Registration Deadline

Here’s the final programme for Affect and Social Media 3.0 (Thurs 25th May at UEL’s Dockland’s campus in East London). Please note registration closes on May 18th.

Programme1ProgrammeJpG

Register before 18th May: https://www.uel.ac.uk/Events/2017/05/Affect-and-Social-Media-3

UEL’s Docklands campus is on the DLR (Cyprus Station 25mins from Tower Gateway, Tower Hill)

 

Culture War: Affective Cultural Politics, Tepid Nationalism, and Art Activism

Culture War

Culture War: Affective Cultural Politics, Tepid Nationalism, and Art Activism
Wonderful new book (out in May) from Camilla Møhring Reestorff – one of our speakers at on May 25th.
It will be out in May on Intellect, so very timely.
The culture wars—intertwining art, culture, and politics—have sparked prominent political debates across the globe for many years, but particularly in Europe and America since 2001. Focusing specifically on the experience of Denmark during this period, Culture War aims to analyze and understand the rise of right-wing nationalism in Europe as part of the globalization and mediatization of the modern nation state and the culture war and affective politics arising from it. This culture war provides an example of an affective cultural politics in which institutional structures become entwined with media representations, events, and patterns of belonging.
Employing a detailed and critically reflective argument covering social media, television, political campaigns, advertising, and “artivism,” Camilla Møhring Reestorff refuses the traditional distinction between the world of visual culture and the political domain, and she provides multiple tools for understanding the dynamics of contemporary affective cultural politics in a highly mediatized environment.
Review Quotes
Ib Bondebjerg, University of Copenhagen
“Offers a vital contribution to the study of national cultures in an era of mediatization and globalization.”
Kristin Sharp, RMIT University
“Provides a thoroughly engaging account of government and art participants and how they partake in national-cultural political discourse and the shaping of the national symbolic through affect.”

Digital atmospheres: affective practices of care in Elefriends

Fascinating article on care, affect and social media by Ian M Tucker and Lewis Goodings in Sociology of Health & Illness Vol. xx No. xx 2017 ISSN 0141-9889, pp. 114.

“We nd that the caring relations developed through social media
often need to be cared for themselves.”

Ian will be doing a paper on Simondon at the Affect and Social Media Conference on May 25th at UEL.

Lewis and Ian are also contributing to the forthcoming A&SM edited book.

Abstract
This article develops the concept of digital atmosphere to analyse the affective power
of social media to shape practices of care and support for people living with mental
distress. Using contemporary accounts of affective atm ospheres, the article focuses
on feelings of distress, support and care that unfold through digital atmospheres. The
power of social media intersects with peoples support and care-seeking practices in
multiple ways and not in a straightforward model of accessing or providing
support. Indeed, we nd that the caring relations developed through social media
often need to be cared for themselves. The article draws on online and interview data
from a larger project investigating how practices of care and support are
(re)congured in the mental health-related social media site Elefriends. Users have to
negotiate the disruption of moving support online, as well as the possibility of
becoming subject to a fragility in care, in which caring for oneself becomes bound up
in the ambiguities of caring for others. We argue that understanding how experiences
of distress are shaped by social media is essential for understanding the implications
of the increased digitisati on of mental healthcare.
Keywords: social media, mental distress, digital atmosphere, affect, Elefriends
Mental distress, social media and affect
The experience of mental distress is increasingly shaped by social media (Aboujaoude and Starcevic 2015, Bauman and Rivers 2015). The proliferation of social media in the digital age has led to the development of a range of mental healthfocused social media, designed as tools for support for people suffering ongoing mental distress (see Hamm et al. 2013 for a useful review). This article focuses on the use of one social media site as a digital space that facilitates peer support. We aim to explore the affective experience of using the site Elefriends and the dilemmas and challenges that are produced in the act of co-constituting distress (and responses to distress) via an online platform. The concept of digital atmosphere is developed to analyse the individual and collective forms of affective experienc e emerging in and through social media. This builds on the growing literature on
atmospheres that has developed in affect studies (Anderson 2014, Brennan 2004). The use of the concept of atmosphere allows us to address experiences of distress through encounters between bodies and social media as technological objects, as well as digital spaces for interaction. Such encounters involve the transmission of affects that come to inform and produce individual feelings of distress.
 

Jessica Ringrose & Emma Renold keynotes at A&SM3 at UEL, 25th May

We are very pleased to announce that Prof Emma Renold (Cardiff) will join Prof Jessica Ringrose (UCL) as our second keynote speaker at this year’s Affect and Social Media 3.00. Hosted by UEL on 25th May 2017.

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Jessica Ringrose is Professor of Sociology of Gender and Education, at the UCL Institute of Education. Her work develops innovative feminist approaches to understanding subjectivity, affectivity and assembled power relations. Recent research projects explore digitial feminist activism, teen feminism in schools, and young people’s networked sexual cultures and uses of social media. Her books include: Post-Feminist Education? (Routledge, 2013); Deleuze and Research Methodologies (EUP, 2013); Children, Sexuality and Sexualisation (Palgrave, 2015); and she is currently working on two new books Gender, Activism and #FeministGirl (Routledge) with Professor Emma Renold, and Digital Feminist Activism: Girls and Women Fight back against Rape Culture (Oxford University Press) with Dr Kaitlynn Mendes and Dr Jessalynn Keller).

Professor Jessica Ringrose

Program Leader Social Justice and Education MA

Co-Chair Gender and Education Association

Series Editor Routledge Critical Studies in Gender and Sexuality in Education

 

Emma Renold is Professor in Childhood Studies at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University. She is the author of ‘Girls, Boys and Junior Sexualities’ (2005), Children, Sexuality and Sexualisation’ (with Ringrose and Egan, 2015) and ‘Agenda: A Young People’s Guide to Making Positive Relationships Matter’ (2016). She is currently working on a book project, ‘Gender Activisms and #FeministGirl’ with Professor Jessica Ringrose (Routledge forthcoming 2018).

Inspired by new feminist materialist and queer posthumanist theory, her research investigates how gender and sexuality intra-act and come to matter in children and young people’s everyday lives across diverse sites, spaces and locales. Recent projects (see www.productivemargins.ac.uk) explore the affordances of co-productive, creative and affective methodologies to engage social and political change on young people’s experiences of gendered and sexual violence.

 

A&SM3 Final Call for Papers and Art Works: https://www.uel.ac.uk/Events/2017/05/Affect-and-Social-Media-3

A&SM3 Registration: http://estore.uel.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/schools/arts-and-digital-industries/affect-social-media3?_ga=1.148390705.72409227.1486384530

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